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Poster: SkyDawg Date: Feb 15, 2009 10:12pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: It was early in your dead career...And you did not know how historic it was......did you have a moment like this?

Just curious cpw, was there an announcement made at the October 4,1970 Winterland show that Janis had died, or was this news held back to prevent a bummer?

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Poster: cream-puff-war Date: Feb 16, 2009 2:39am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: It was early in your dead career...And you did not know how historic it was......did you have a moment like this?

They didn't announce it.

The show was quadrophonically telecast - check out the reviews posted on the 2 versions here on the archive for the very interesting details.

The bands knew about her passing that night, and like troopers, rallied in her memory (I presume) and made damn sure the show must go on, on an upbeat vibe...
the Dead played their hearts out, no doubt in a public/private farewell to the queen of their scene...

her passing was a great loss to all and sundry, certainly to her peers in the Family Dog et. al...
musicians, artists and everyday people who were deeply touched by her spirit...

Pearl (the last recording sessions she made) was her triumph, albeit a posthumous legacy which ironically became her greatest hit - Janis' premature departure from this miserable world left a gap that no one has ever even come close to filling.

She was in the same league as Jerry Garcia, Pigpen, and others we put on the highest of pedastals... with good reason...

The friend I took to that show, a good buddy from high school - his first time at a live Dead concert was that night - he said since then that he was inspired by the Dead's set so much - realizing this was how it worked...

Glitz and glam were not at the heart of what the Dead did, call it folk, blues, or rock and roll - the Grateful Dead that night showed him something so real, so out front, that Mark "Mu" Ungar became a serious musician for the rest of his life.
MU's still at it now, and fortune or fame isn't his motivation for playing on, rather the love of music is.


Get it while you can...



This post was modified by cream-puff-war on 2009-02-16 10:39:43

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